How buzz on Russia dossier undermines bilateral relations between Moscow and Washington

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There are at least five investigations into Russia’s alleged meddling in the 2016 U.S. election, conducted by congressional committees, subcommittees and Special Council Robert Mueller. This creates a robust anti-Trump consensus in the U.S., and it should not be underestimated. It turns into the anti-Russian one. This dynamics creates a whole series of potential threats to the US-Russian relations, up to the attempts to provoke a direct conflict between the two countries.

Russian Revolution and Its Centenary: No Longer Politics, Not Yet History

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Russia experienced its revolution late in the game. By that time, most Western countries had already gone through coups and industrialization and promptly rejected feudal rules and practices. Most importantly, they had had enough time to resign themselves to their revolutions and their consequences and national scars left by any upheaval had healed. Moreover, countries and peoples are – if not proud – not ashamed of the past events. In terms of historical memory, revolutions are often reconciled with national archetypes.

“Democracy May Become a Phenomenon of the Past”

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The issue of possible reforms in the Russian political system after March 2018 election has been recently discussed more and more often. Gazeta.Ru has discussed their probability and essence with Dmitriy Badovskiy, head of the Institute of Socio-Economic and Political Researches (ISEPR Foundation), one of the key advisors to Vyacheslav Volodin, former top domestic politics official of the Presidential Executive Office, State Duma Speaker.

Japan’s Ruling Coalition’s Victory is a Good News for Russia

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Following the results of the general election that took place in Japan October 22, the ruling coalition of Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) and centrist New Komeito Party won more than two-thirds of 465 seats in Parliament’s lower chamber. This is shown by the official data published on Monday by country’s Central Electoral Commission.

Ships of Every Flag Shall Come: IPU Assembly in the Cradle of Russian Parliamentarianism

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The 137th Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) Assembly, the world’s oldest political organization uniting national parliaments of 173 sovereign states, is due to open in St. Petersburg on Saturday. Russian President Vladimir Putin is to attend the grand opening ceremony. The Tavrichesky Palace (Tauride Palace), the cradle of Russian parliamentarism, will be the main venue of the forum scheduled for October 14-18.

Autumn Marathon in the Foggy Albion

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A snap election to the lower chamber of Britain’s parliament of June 9 that resulted in a disastrous Tory failure and another hung parliament is behind. Now it is time for a party marathon. In September-October political parties that won seats in the House of Commons hold their party conferences.

Britain’s Social Media Woes

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Social media and especially microblogging are trending buzzwords in the public diplomacy scene. Disproportionate attention is paid to individual posts and trends on social media by the mainstream media. The best case are the tweets of Donald Trump, the president of the USA. They are reported on and analysed daily with unparalleled ferocity, with some outlets meticulously collecting all of the President’s social media comments. It has come to a point at which discussing social media is beating an already beaten up dead horse. Nevertheless, this weekend’s latest news requires comment and policy recommendation.

Nation-Branding: the Case of Russia

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Russia seems to have finally realized in recent years that nation branding, seen as a set of actions to improve country’s image abroad, is a form of investment, not a cost. In order to analyze the Russian approach to nation branding, it is necessary to highlight several dimensions: economic, scientific, cultural, sport, media, and development.

Donald Trump is America’s Boris Yeltsin. What The Two Presidents Have In Common

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When US President Trump on August 2 signed a bill that reinforces and expands to some extent sanctions on Moscow, the anti-Russian campaign emerged somewhat divorced from real policy-making. The bill has clarified the Congress position on the matter, with the ongoing investigation into Trump’s and his acolytes’ alleged ties with Russia shifting public attention to the legal aspect. While lambasting Trump, some intellectuals seek to establish nominal correlations between the US president and Russia and to draw historical parallels between the two countries. This clearly creative approach on the part of experts and pundits produces remarkable results.