Drafting Parliamentarianism

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The first session of the State Duma’s seventh convocation took place in October 2016. However, Russian parliamentarianism is more deeply rooted in history. If we take into account the pre-revolutionary Dumas, it is the eleventh convocation.

USSR: the Unnecessary Collapse

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A quarter-century ago the Soviet Union disappeared. Valery Fedorov, director general of the Russian Public Opinion Research Center (WCIOM), talked to the Istorick magazine [“Historian”] about the reasons for country’s disintegration, the role of Mikhail Gorbachev and Boris Yeltsin and about what the nostalgia for the USSR is like in modern Russia.

First Step Towards Final Victory

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On December 1941, the Soviet troops began the counteroffensive in the Battle of Moscow, whose 75th anniversary we are celebrating this year. The Red Army’s operation culminated in the failed blitzkrieg…

Leningrad’s Siege

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The 872-day Siege of Leningrad lauded as a unique example of Soviet courage and endurance started 75 years ago. The citizens did not capitulate to the enemy and managed to hold out against severe hardships. January 27, the day of removing the blockade, is a memorable day of Military Honor in Russia.

Three Days in August

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Dramatic events which went down in history as August Putsch unfolded in Moscow on August 19-21, 1991. Today is the 25th anniversary of the events.

European Referendums Brief

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Since 1972 European countries have held 57 referendums on European issues. 21 of these referendums have been held on the accession to the EU. It looks like if Brexit happens, Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary and France will follow the lead of the UK.

Russia Day

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Today the entire country is celebrating Russia Day. What unifies us on the vast territories called Russia? It is the Russian language, historical memory and, of course, patriotism, love for the place where we were born and raised and for the people who are inseparable from us.

Timeless Crimea: Looking at the Peninsula on Maps from Different Epochs

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Crimea appeared on ancient maps of many people from around the world and each time it looked different. The first attempt to place the peninsula on the world map was made by Pietro Veskonte from Venice in the 14th century. More attempts to depict Crimea took place at the end of the Middle Ages and at the onset of the Renaissance. Cartography, however, got a major impulse in Crimea during the Russian-Turkish wars, when the Russian Empire was in dire need of truly detailed maps of this key region of the northern Black Sea coast.

How Crimea Turned Russian

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On 8 April, 1783, Russian Empress Catherine II signed the decree “On Accession of the Crimean Peninsula, the Taman Island and the Kuban Region to the Russian Empire.” Everyone was due to maintain the document in secrecy until the integration became a fait accompli. The transition was smooth and peaceful, but this triumph was preceded by years of political friction and strife in which Catherine the Great and Prince Potemkin, the Empress’s right-hand man in all her endeavors, had played the first fiddle.