Foreign Press Review (13.02-19.02)

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Last week the most resonant event was a resignation of US National Security Advisor Michael Flynn in the wake of information, collected by intelligence services, that he had discussed possible lifting of sanctions with Russia’s Ambassador Sergey Kislyak prior to Trump taking office and had provided “incomplete information” about these contacts.

Foreign Press Review (06.02-12.02)

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Last week witnessed another information battle in the US media as Fox News host Bill O’Reilly called Russian President Vladimir Putin “a killer” during an interview with US President Donald Trump, but Trump said in response that “there are a lot of killers. We’ve got a lot of killers. What, you think our country’s so innocent?” reminding the interviewer about the US invasion of Iraq. This statement provoked a burning debate in the US with some hawks accusing Trump of betrayal of his voters and describing his words as “anti-American”.

Foreign Press Review (30.01-05.02)

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The Ukrainian conflict escalated dramatically last week. The media almost immediately called this outburst of violence in Eastern Ukraine “a test for Donald Trump”, but mostly tried to persuade readers that the test was prepared by Russian President Vladimir Putin, rather than by the Ukrainian authorities.

Foreign Press Review (23.01-29.01)

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Last week the peace talks between the Syrian government and opposition were held in Astana. It was their first face-to-face meeting in almost six years of war in Syria. The negotiations were brokered by Russia, Iran and Turkey while the West was sidelined with the US being only present as an observer. Probably Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump discussed the question on Saturday during their first official telephone conversation. Besides, journalists forecasted that the presidents could touch on the US sanctions against Russia. Observers think the call could open a dialogue leading to lifting of the sanctions. Meanwhile, in contrast to Trump, who stated that he hoped for “a great relationship with Russia”, Theresa May outlined her own quite hawkish vision of future relations with Moscow.

Foreign Press Review (16.01-22.01)

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Last week Donald Trump was inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States. Analysts think his presidency could be a new era not only for America, but also for the existing world order and for Russia-US relations in particular. The inauguration took place amid new reports about the investigation American law enforcement and intelligence agencies have been carrying out to examine alleged Russian interference, including possible covert money flows from the Kremlin and links between associates of the new President and Russian officials. Meanwhile, Russian President Vladimir Putin clearly explained that the reports about “kompromat” were “total nonsense” and were fabricated to “undermine the legitimacy” of Trump’s presidency.

Foreign Press Review (09.01-15.01)

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Recently the US intelligence community published a widely discussed and highly criticized report on Russia’s alleged interference in the US presidential elections. But last week a new information bomb exploded with journalists themselves debating questions over media ethics.

Foreign Press Review (19.12-25.12)

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Last week the Russian ambassador to Turkey Andrei Karlov was shot dead at the opening of an art exhibition in Ankara. The killer was a Turkish police officer, who shouted after firing “Don’t forget Aleppo. Don’t forget Syria”. Some experts initially expressed concern that the assassination could result in a new standoff in Russia-Turkey relations similar to the consequences of shooting down a Russian fighter jet in 2015 while others even compared it to the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo in 1914, which led to World War I. However, almost immediately the leadership of both countries emphasized that they consider Karlov’s murder as a “provocation” aimed at undermining rapprochement between Moscow and Ankara.

Foreign Press Review (12.12-18.12)

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Last week the “hysteria” around the alleged Russia’s meddling into the US presidential election continued to dominate the headlines. Firstly it was said in the media that the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which is responsible for overseeing the US intelligence community, did not fully embrace the recent CIA findings that the Russia’s aim was to help Trump win.